WRITER FOR GAMES
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SALIX GAMES| Dance of Death: Du Lac & Fey

Rebecca Haigh is a writer for games| Du Lac & Fey: Dance of Death and ATONE.

 

SALIX GAMES| Dance of Death: Du Lac & Fey

SCRIPT WRITER

Feb 2017 - APRIL 2019

Writing dialogue for oneshots, branching conversations and callouts.

Writing in-game text for collectables, historical codex, and NPC bios.

Writing and designing a main game chapter.

I wrote a song!

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Salix are a London / Guildford based indie developer comprising of ex-AAA devs from the likes of Lionhead, Rocksteady and Ubisoft. 

DANCE OF DEATH: DU LAC & FEY places cursed Arthurian immortals, Sir Lancelot Du Lac and Lady Morgana Le Fey, into England's smog-choked heart as they attempt to track down Jack the Ripper and put an end to the Whitechapel Murders of 1888. All with the help of Whitechapel local, Mary Jane Kelly - but of course!

Philip Huxley and Rebecca Haigh at Pinewood Studios, Shepperton.

Philip Huxley and Rebecca Haigh at Pinewood Studios, Shepperton.

The game features voice performances from the talent pools of Dragon Age, Penny Dreadful, Black Mirror and Game of Thrones.

I had the good fortune to be asked along to the voice over sessions where I got to experience the main cast bringing the script to life.

Du Lac and Fey survey a crime scene.

Du Lac and Fey survey a crime scene.

set during the latter half of the 19th century, du lac & fey presented a fascinating, historical challenge.

Research was key to this project, and we worked closely with Victorian historians, Judith Flanders and Hallie Rubenhold, to ensure that all that was not fantastical was routed in fact.

DU LAC & FEY| Press.

JAMES - GEEKS WORLDWIDE

“The visuals and gameplay are on par with anything that Telltale Games has put out over the last few years. The story is intriguing and well-defined, and the characters feature voice-overs from professional actors.”

ALYSSA HATMAKER - DESTRUCTOID

“It looks and sounds like a world I want to take part in.”

AUSTIN WOOD - PC GAMER

“A normal day in Victorian London.”